Thoughts on economics and liberty

Category: Philosophy

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Breach of the Nuremberg Code on a mass scale by lockdowns IS definitely a crime against humanity

The breach of the Nuremberg Code on such a large scale that the lockdowns do is, in my view, LEGALLY a crime against humanity. Here is the proof.

All legal documents should probably start including this now, since the matter will probably need to go to the ICC in the future. The “intent” is clear since no approved government plan included lockdowns.

They broke these plans in complete breach of the Nuremberg Code and without any prior approval. I have provided a lot more detail in my book and Samuel Griffith Society paper linked at http://liberatevictoria.org.

Definition of a Crime Against Humanity

This is how a Crime Against Humanity is defined by the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court

Article 7 – Crimes against humanity

  1. For the purpose of this Statute, “crime against humanity” means any of the following acts when committed as part of a widespread or systematic attack directed against any civilian population, with knowledge of the attack:
    1. Murder;
    2. Extermination;
    3. Enslavement;
    4. Deportation or forcible transfer of population;
    5. Imprisonment or other severe deprivation of physical liberty in violation of fundamental rules of international law;
    6. Torture;
    7. Rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, forced pregnancy, enforced sterilization, or any other form of sexual violence of comparable gravity;
    8. Persecution against any identifiable group or collectivity on political, racial, national, ethnic, cultural, religious, gender as defined in paragraph 3, or other grounds that are universally recognized as impermissible under international law, in connection with any act referred to in this paragraph or any crime within the jurisdiction of the Court;
    9. Enforced disappearance of persons;
    10. The crime of apartheid;
    11. Other inhumane acts of a similar character intentionally causing great suffering, or serious injury to body or to mental or physical health.

There is significant case law in the USA (and presumably elsewhere) that accepts the Nuremberg Code

The Nuremberg Code and Informed Consent for Research

(Merz JF. The Nuremberg Code and Informed Consent for Research. JAMA. 2018;319(1):85–86. doi:10.1001/jama.2017.17704)

My review of case law identified 19 published opinions from state and federal courts (applying federal law as well as the laws of Arizona, Florida, California, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, and Pennsylvania) that recognize the duty of researchers to secure an informed consent from research participants. Four of those courts favorably recited the International Medical Tribunal decision or the code among other sources for establishing the duty.

 

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Johannes Bronckhorst’s studies of ancient Vedic religion and Buddhism

This indologist seems to have arrived at very similar views to that of Sanjay Sonawani.

e.g. Brahmanism: Its place in ancient Indian society – Johannes Bronkhorst (PDF and RTF).

 

 

His other works include:Greater Magadha (2007; Indian reprint 2013), Buddhism in the Shadow of Brahmanism (2011; Indian reprint in preparation) and How the Brahmins Won (2016).

Worth finding time to read this scholar.

This is a placeholder post. Will add notes as I find time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Frederick Douglass and Gandhi both wanted the poor to be left free

Gandhi wrote: ‘All the help that the poor need is that the world gets off their backs’.

And Frederick Douglass wrote: “if the Negro cannot stand on his own legs, let him fall”.

The common theme is to STOP the “do-gooders” particularly government from destroying the poor with their misguided charity.

The article below has particular relevance in India with its strong affirmative action policies.

Sowell’s “FRIENDS ” OF BLACKS

Who was it who said, “if the Negro cannot stand on his own legs, let him fall”?

Ronald Reagan? Newt Gingrich? Charles Murray?

Not even close. It was Frederick Douglass!

This was part of a speech in which Douglass also said: “Everybody has asked the question… ‘What shall we do with the Negro?’ I have had but one answer from the beginning. Do nothing with us! Your doing with us has already played the mischief with us. Do nothing with us!”

Frederick Douglass had achieved a deeper understanding in the 19th century than any of the black “leaders” of today. Those whites who feel a need to do something with blacks and for blacks have been some of the most dangerous “friends” of blacks.

Academia is the home of many such “friends,” which is why there are not only double standards of admissions to colleges but also in some places double standards in grading. The late David Riesman called it “affirmative grading.”

A professor at one of California’s state universities where black students are allowed to graduate on the basis of easier standards put it bluntly: “We are just lying to these black students when we give them degrees.” That lie is particularly deadly when the degree is a medical degree, authorizing someone to treat sick people or perform surgery on children.

For years, Dr. Patrick Chavis was held up as a shining example of the success of affirmative action, for he was admitted to medical school as a result of minority preferences and went back to the black community to practice medicine. In fact, he was publicly praised by the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights—just two weeks before his license was suspended, after his patients died under conditions that brought the matter to the attention of the Medical Board of California.

An administrative law judge referred to Chavis’ “inability to perform some of the most basic duties required of a physician.” A year later, after a fuller investigation, his license was revoked.

Those who had for years been using Chavis as a shining example of the success of affirmative action suddenly changed tactics and claimed that an isolated example of failure proved nothing. Sadly, Chavis was not an isolated example.

When a professor at the Harvard Medical School declared publicly, back in the 1970s, that black students were being allowed to graduate from that institution without meeting the same standards as others, he was denounced as a “racist”for saying that it was cruel to “allow trusting patients to pay for our irresponsibility”—trusting black patients, in many cases.

Why do supposedly responsible people create such dangerous double standards? Some imagine that they are being friends to blacks by lowering the standards for them. Some don’t think that blacks have what it takes to meet real standards, and that colleges and universities will lose their “diversity”—and perhaps federal money with it—if they don’t lower the standards, in order to get an acceptable racial body count.

My own experience as a teacher was that black students would meet higher standards if you refused to lower the standards for them. This was not the royal road to popularity, either with the students themselves or with the “friends” of blacks on the faculty and in the administration. But, when the dust finally settled, the students met the standards.

We have gotten so used to abysmal performances from black students, beginning in failing ghetto schools, that it is hard for some to believe that black students once did a lot better than they do today, at least in places and times with good schools. As far back as the First World War, black soldiers from New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, and Ohio scored higher on mental tests than white soldiers from Georgia, Arkansas, Kentucky, and Mississippi.

During the 1940s, black students in Harlem schools had test scores very similar to those of white working class students on the lower east side of New York. Sometimes the Harlem scores were a little higher or a little lower, but they were never miles behind, the way they are today in many ghetto schools. If blacks could do better back when their opportunities were worse, why can’t today’s ghetto students do better? Perhaps blacks have too many “friends” today.

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