Thoughts on economics and liberty

Soft racism against Indians in Australia, re-confirmed

Kevin Dunn a professor of geography and urban studies in the University of Western Sydney has re-confirmed the prevalence of soft racism in Australia. Basically people of Indian ,,, background were an average of 18 per cent more likely to experience discrimination and racial intolerance than other Australians.

There is NO evidence, however, to suggest that soft racism translates into violence (hard racism).

Yes, many (not all!) Australians DO discriminate on the basis of skin colour, but assault is a different matter altogether. (It would be good to apply the methodology WITHIN India. I suspect the level of soft racism within India will be found to be MUCH HIGHER.) 

 
[N]ew analysis suggested Indian and Sri Lankan-born Australians reported higher levels of racism in such areas as the workplace, in education, when renting or buying a house, at shops and at sporting or public events. [T]e findings suggested the experience of racism for Indian-Australians was high even when compared with other non-Anglo Australians.
 
The study found:
  • 40.8 per cent of Indian and Sri Lankan-born Australians said they had experienced racism in the workplace, compared with 12.8 per cent of Australian-born respondents and 29.7 per cent of overseas-born respondents.
  • 42.6 per cent of such respondents had experienced racism at a shop or restaurant, compared with 15.5 per cent Australian-born and 22.4 per cent of overseas-born.
  • 38.5 per cent had experienced racism at a sporting or public event, compared with 13.8 per cent of Australian-born and 23.1 per cent of overseas-born.
  • 28.4 per cent said they had experienced racism in education, compared with 14.5 per cent Australian-born and 21 per cent of overseas-born.
  • And 43.2 per cent said they had experienced discrimination in the form of name-calling and similar insults, and 41.9 per cent said they had been treated less respectfully because of their ethnic origin.
The study suggested people of Indian and Sri Lankan background were an average of 18 per cent more likely to experience discrimination and racial intolerance than other Australians.

View more posts from this author
4 thoughts on “Soft racism against Indians in Australia, re-confirmed
  1. Peter Hall

    Sorry, as a white Australian, I find your blog racist and offensive in the most extreme.

    The very reason you have such data is that Australia as a society actively tries to reduce racism.

    Indians seem to perceive racism by non Indians as a answer for everything. They forgot to book a Restaurant, and when they arrive and there is not table for them, its racism, Or they didn’t get a job, it is not because they were not qualitifed or experienced, it is because of racism.

    India is far more racist than Australia ever has been or ever will and its an extension of Indian racist attitudes that they call everybody else racist, especially whites.

    Indians who are born and raised in Australia are so very different and do not cry racism every 30 seconds like immigrant Indians. The reason is that they have not been raised in the Indian racist culture. Articles like this just reinforce the Indian racist mentality towards white people.

    Racist is not just the domain of whites, to be honest, the white countries have been far more tolerant of other cultures than the cultures that always claim to be discriminated against.

    Maybe the Indian culture needs to reform before it points the finger of racism towards others., Indians raised outside of the Indian culture do not seem to have the same chip on their shoulder. So it is not Indian individuals, but something more that is the problem.

     
  2. Sanjeev Sabhlok

    Peter, I’m not sure which part of the blog you find racist, because I’m the most vocal advocate against racism. Maybe if you point out something specific I could comment.

    I agree with you (and have repeatedly mentioned on this blog and elsewhere) that India is a far more racist place than Australia. But I’m not just sitting there and observing. I’m trying to change this.

    Anyway, I’m in agreement with most of what you have written.

    There are different individuals everywhere, and our job is to ensure that everyone has equal liberty and equal dignity. Join me in fighting caste/racism.

    s

     

     
  3. josh

    hey my name josh, and i have a question.
    I know this article is old but would you happen have the link to figures reguarding…
    “28.4 per cent said they had experienced racism in education, compared with 14.5 per cent Australian-born and 21 per cent of overseas-born”
    I am doing my society and culture Personal interest project and i would love to see where you got those figures.
    Thanks