Thoughts on economics and liberty

Mr Narayana Murthy, please do something or admit you are a stooge of Congress

I was browsing through N.Murthy’s book, A Better India A Better World (which I had bought one year ago but hadn't yet found time to read), and came across something that brought bad memories, and a strong sense of revulsion. Let me show, below, the disconnect between what Mr Murthy says (and others like him say) and what he practices.

His address at the IIT Delhi 32nd convention (2001) is linked here. Just a few key extracts first and then my comments. In the introduction to the book somewhere he riles against socialism, and pretends to promote freedom. Then this:

On The Indian of the 21st Century 

When India started its tryst with destiny, there was an enthusiasm for nation-building that lasted till the early 1960s. As you know, this dissipated into frustration by the 1970s. I was a diehard socialist at that time – concerned about removing poverty. [Sanjeev Sabhlok's comment: even the capitalist is concerned about it. That's not the key issue re: socialism] Among other things, the travails of creating and running a business put paid to all illusions I had about the merits of centralized planning. Importing a computer required the head of a corporation to make 20 to 25 trips to Delhi. A clerk in RBI would take five days to decide whether the MD of a software firm could travel abroad for a day! In those days, the successful Indian was one who had good contacts with the omnipotent Babudom.
 
With the 1991 reforms, we secured a measure of freedom to make economic decisions within the corporation. Now, we could get down to the serious business of creating wealth and, consequently, creating a better society. The sense of enthusiasm was a marked contrast to the earlier years. In the decade gone by, several Indian companies have competed successfully with the best in the world. Indian professionals now command the highest respect across the globe. Rajat Gupta, Vinod Khosla and other alumni from your institute have gone on to mould and create institutions to be proud of. It is against this backdrop that you graduate into a time full of opportunities.  
 
Over five decades of independence – what does our nation have to show for it?  With an adult literacy rate of 56.5% and with 35% of the population below the poverty line, the nation's social welfare efforts are an unqualified disaster. 
 
we need a new Indian mindset for the 21st century. Let me talk a little about the cardinal attributes of this mindset. 

Thanks to colonization of over a thousand years, our society is one where people are distrusted and oppressed. A society where the interest of the government is seen as more important than the interest of the people; where the jobs of a few thousand people in public sector institutions are held more sacrosanct than the millions of consumers they are expected to serve; where an Indian multinational feels less trusted by its own government than by governments abroad; and where bureaucrats assume that they know more about running world-class technological institutions than the finest intellectuals in those organizations.
 
Unfortunately, even after fifty years of independence, we have not overcome the legacy mindset of our erstwhile rulers who, ironically, have themselves changed rapidly in their own country. We have to understand that public sector interest is not public interest and that the interest of the government is not the same as the interest of the people. One demonstration of this understanding is the proactive removal of all monopolies for the government. Government monopolies all over the world invariably create asymmetry between the benefits to government officials and the people. It is difficult for me to understand why the government retains licensing in education while it has disbanded industrial licensing to a large extent. Over a period of ten to twenty years, the government should gradually get out of all activities other than defence, external affairs, home, macroeconomic policy-making, and regulation in all areas of commerce.
 
Another bane of this thousand-year long enslavement is apathy. The main reason why India is still very backward is our unwillingness to take proactive action even when the solution to the problem is staring us in the face for a long time. A fatalist mentality conveniently blames reality and refuses to take responsibility for solving problems. We have become a nation that is good in rhetoric but poor in action.
 
we have become, perhaps, the only nation in the world where people fight to be called backward rather than forward!
 
We adopted an economic model where the government took on the responsibility to create and sustain jobs without any regard for efficiency and accountability. The result is underemployment, inefficiency, insubordination, demoralisation of the merited ones and value destruction in the economy. 
 
the reputation of the Indian professional is very poor in living up to contractual obligations. In fact, a large number of the professionals who received financial assistance either from the government or from educational institutions for studies abroad have gone back on their repayment commitments in a manner that neither they nor their children can ever be proud of. One hundred percent compliance with contracts is the only way to help future generations benefit from initiatives to provide financial help to worthy and needy students.  
 

My comment

Seems to be the right thing to say, isn't it? I say similar things, too.
 
So what's wrong with this? Nothing on the surface.
 
But there is a fundamental disconnect between what Mr Murthy says and what he does. 
 
I believe it it TOTALLY WRONG to exhort others to not indulge in rhetoric but to take action when he himself is the CLASSIC EXAMPLE OF RHETORIC, NOT ACTION.
 
Just as the credibility of people like MMS and Shashi Tharoor has been totally shredded by their joining and supporting the most corrupt outfit in India's 5000 year history – the CONgress party – so also Mr. Murthy's credibility has been shot to pieces by his mere exhortation without action for the past decade. How many times does one have to listen to this blather, with ZERO action.
 
The same approach has been taken by Nandan Nilekani (see this). These people say a lot but the moment time comes to take action, they freeze – in fright or in cowardice.
 
JRD Tata was the ONLY leading Indian businessman who, in the midst of grave danger to his own company's prospects, had the courage to fight Nehru and funded Swatantra Party. These people are puny pygmies in comparison. They have far greater wealth, and far greater connectivity, but ZERO courage. Not even a pale imitation of JRD in courage and leadership.
 
I say these strong words with deep regret since for many years I had hoped that India's fight for freedom will be fought on the shoulders of IT geniuses such as these, for they always seemed to say the right thing. But then they rushed to the coat tails of Sonia Gandhi. ZERO SELF RESPECT.
 
Let me exhort them (and mine is not idle rhetoric: I have actually given up a major career in India in the IAS for the sake of a much greater future for India) – that if they are CITIZENS OF INDIA and not slaves of Sonia Gandhi and the corrupt gangsters who rule India, then let them stand up and launch a political movement for reform. Enough said. Either do something or SHUT UP. This hypocrisy just boils my blood.
 
If they are genuinely serious, they should join FTI and give it the filip it deserves, as the ONLY pre-political formation that is determined to enhance freedom in India. Do this, or be sidelined in history as stooges of the Congress Party and ENEMIES of the people of India. The world is black and white. Either you are with the White Force or against it.
 

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38 thoughts on “Mr Narayana Murthy, please do something or admit you are a stooge of Congress
  1. Sanjeev Sabhlok

    Thanks, Gopi

    There were no doubt a few, but clearly JRD was at the forefront of it all. It will be truly worthwhile to prepare a book documenting the writings (and actions!) of these true heroes. I’m sick of reading books by these wannabe heroes who are afraid to either directly (themselves) or indirectly (through people like me) battle the misgovernance they constantly complain about.

    Regards
    Sanjeev

     
  2. Sanjeev Sabhlok

    Thanks, Gopi

    There were no doubt a few, but clearly JRD was at the forefront of it all. It will be truly worthwhile to prepare a book documenting the writings (and actions!) of these true heroes. I’m sick of reading books by these wannabe heroes who are afraid to either directly (themselves) or indirectly (through people like me) battle the misgovernance they constantly complain about.

    Regards
    Sanjeev

     
  3. anup

    oh please!!! each one has a role to play; so stop dissing on other people’s efforts. you are simply trying to fight this battle on the internet sitting there in australia. can you imagine how courageous it is to pull up the government (read the gandhi monopolisers) publicly vis a vis a true nationalist patriot? and here you are trying to nitpick! why don’t you come to india and lead this movement on this soil? i know you wouldn’t because you know you cannot get yourself to take such a chance…. so please, a little less conversation, a little more action please

     
  4. anup

    oh please!!! each one has a role to play; so stop dissing on other people’s efforts. you are simply trying to fight this battle on the internet sitting there in australia. can you imagine how courageous it is to pull up the government (read the gandhi monopolisers) publicly vis a vis a true nationalist patriot? and here you are trying to nitpick! why don’t you come to india and lead this movement on this soil? i know you wouldn’t because you know you cannot get yourself to take such a chance…. so please, a little less conversation, a little more action please

     
  5. Sanjeev Sabhlok

    Dear Anup

    I have been working for a political alternative since 1998. Everyone who knows me knows that. In that process I have personally met virtually all major IT leaders of India. They have ALL declined to challenge the system. I don’t mind if they do their business and SHUT UP. But these people claim (a) to be honest, and (b) that they want change, and yet are busy holding the coat tails of Sonia Gandhi for shelter every time I look at them.

    If they are honest they can’t say one thing and do another. They can’t want change and yet run after the gangsters that have been looting India. Either they DIRECTLY oppose corruption or they should SHUT UP. Enough of their hypocrisy in saying something but ACTIVELY supporting the corrupt political parties of India.

    As regards me, I am happy to lead in India but where are the people? Are you going to sit and watch like others, too? A spectator sport…

    We have been betrayed by our educated people in every regard. These ‘educated’ people have through and through supported the corrupt (save a few exceptions) and keep chattering as if they intend to do something.

    I have found some leaders finally, but a few only yet. FTI is growing on the foundation of these few leaders. If you are capable of leading, join. Else you too can join Murthy and his ilk in talking but sitting on your haunches.

    Regards
    Sanjeev

     
  6. Sanjeev Sabhlok

    Dear Anup

    I have been working for a political alternative since 1998. Everyone who knows me knows that. In that process I have personally met virtually all major IT leaders of India. They have ALL declined to challenge the system. I don’t mind if they do their business and SHUT UP. But these people claim (a) to be honest, and (b) that they want change, and yet are busy holding the coat tails of Sonia Gandhi for shelter every time I look at them.

    If they are honest they can’t say one thing and do another. They can’t want change and yet run after the gangsters that have been looting India. Either they DIRECTLY oppose corruption or they should SHUT UP. Enough of their hypocrisy in saying something but ACTIVELY supporting the corrupt political parties of India.

    As regards me, I am happy to lead in India but where are the people? Are you going to sit and watch like others, too? A spectator sport…

    We have been betrayed by our educated people in every regard. These ‘educated’ people have through and through supported the corrupt (save a few exceptions) and keep chattering as if they intend to do something.

    I have found some leaders finally, but a few only yet. FTI is growing on the foundation of these few leaders. If you are capable of leading, join. Else you too can join Murthy and his ilk in talking but sitting on your haunches.

    Regards
    Sanjeev

     
  7. Maaran

    Why is it so difficult to articulate to the electorate the merits of economic freedom or the de-merits of the status quo.
    I am skeptical if Indian democracy would ever be able to provide the economic freedom we need for mass prosperity.  Was the liberalisation of 1990s a result of the masses demanding economic freedom? I don’t think so.

     
  8. Maaran

    Why is it so difficult to articulate to the electorate the merits of economic freedom or the de-merits of the status quo.
    I am skeptical if Indian democracy would ever be able to provide the economic freedom we need for mass prosperity.  Was the liberalisation of 1990s a result of the masses demanding economic freedom? I don’t think so.

     
  9. Sanjeev Sabhlok

    The problem, Dear Maaran, is not the “masses”. They are, as Sharad Joshi discovered, the first to demand more freedom. It is our ‘educated’ classes with their false teaching in colleges and universities across India who are the problem.

    Note that even in 1998 when I raised the prospect of a liberal party for India, I could not find more than a handful of ‘educated’ people who believed in freedom. So the spectre of Nehru’s socialism has fallen across India – not the people’s penchant for handouts as most people are keen to ‘point out’ to me.

    Show me even 1500 educated people in India today who understand freedom (not just ‘economic freedom’ which is a meaningless concept without the who picture of freedom), and I’ll say you are right.

    The day our ‘educated’ classes will understand how free societies are crucial to our development as humans in every respect (economic, personal, social), that day the “masses” will immediately understand.

    A classical case is this ex-IPS officer (see http://bit.ly/ieCjmU). How can India succeed when people like this are its ‘leaders’?

    My battle since 1998 has been two pronged: (a) preaching freedom and (b) finding and developing leaders. It is a desert out there, I assure you. If there are a few who understand freedom, they don’t have the capacity to deal with people and lead. They are pen pushers of no consequence to anyone: indeed, their morals are often questionable as they run after the droppings of the corrupt socialists (I won’t name but if you’ll look around you’ll find plenty of them! – ‘liberals’ without the iota of self-respect).

    So the problem is not of the ‘masses’ but of us, the educated people.

    Once again (at GREAT personal cost in terms of typing the same thing 10000s of times) please join FTI if you are CAPABLE – else just keep quiet and keep watching quietly from the sidelines like the millions of other ‘educated’ people. I’m a bit tired repeating the same thing again and again.

    Regards
    Sanjeev

     
  10. Sanjeev Sabhlok

    The problem, Dear Maaran, is not the “masses”. They are, as Sharad Joshi discovered, the first to demand more freedom. It is our ‘educated’ classes with their false teaching in colleges and universities across India who are the problem.

    Note that even in 1998 when I raised the prospect of a liberal party for India, I could not find more than a handful of ‘educated’ people who believed in freedom. So the spectre of Nehru’s socialism has fallen across India – not the people’s penchant for handouts as most people are keen to ‘point out’ to me.

    Show me even 1500 educated people in India today who understand freedom (not just ‘economic freedom’ which is a meaningless concept without the who picture of freedom), and I’ll say you are right.

    The day our ‘educated’ classes will understand how free societies are crucial to our development as humans in every respect (economic, personal, social), that day the “masses” will immediately understand.

    A classical case is this ex-IPS officer (see http://bit.ly/ieCjmU). How can India succeed when people like this are its ‘leaders’?

    My battle since 1998 has been two pronged: (a) preaching freedom and (b) finding and developing leaders. It is a desert out there, I assure you. If there are a few who understand freedom, they don’t have the capacity to deal with people and lead. They are pen pushers of no consequence to anyone: indeed, their morals are often questionable as they run after the droppings of the corrupt socialists (I won’t name but if you’ll look around you’ll find plenty of them! – ‘liberals’ without the iota of self-respect).

    So the problem is not of the ‘masses’ but of us, the educated people.

    Once again (at GREAT personal cost in terms of typing the same thing 10000s of times) please join FTI if you are CAPABLE – else just keep quiet and keep watching quietly from the sidelines like the millions of other ‘educated’ people. I’m a bit tired repeating the same thing again and again.

    Regards
    Sanjeev

     
  11. MrA

    Don’t expect this (or any other) IT Honcho to say things that will upset their own stakeholdings and personal wealth / connections. They will mouth the right words but do not hesitate to do what it takes to proect their self-interests which have grown bigger and bigger and across to other countries too outside India. If you like to know specifics why I say so, I can explain and substantiate, please do ask !

     
  12. MrA

    Don’t expect this (or any other) IT Honcho to say things that will upset their own stakeholdings and personal wealth / connections. They will mouth the right words but do not hesitate to do what it takes to proect their self-interests which have grown bigger and bigger and across to other countries too outside India. If you like to know specifics why I say so, I can explain and substantiate, please do ask !

     
  13. Sanjeev Sabhlok

    Thanks, Mr A
    You are obviously using an anonymous mode: go ahead and spill your beans! Treat this like Wikileaks for all practical purposes – should India’s interest be served by such information. If you wish you can send me by email. I won’t publish your details. Personal guarantee.
    Regards
    Sanjeev

     
  14. Sanjeev Sabhlok

    Thanks, Mr A
    You are obviously using an anonymous mode: go ahead and spill your beans! Treat this like Wikileaks for all practical purposes – should India’s interest be served by such information. If you wish you can send me by email. I won’t publish your details. Personal guarantee.
    Regards
    Sanjeev

     
  15. chaitanya

    Hi Dr.Sabhlok,
    Every person has a set of natural talents that one employs. NM was initially a technical guy, then moved onto business, and now to book-writing, mentoring or whatever he does. So his natural skills are perhaps technical skills, business skills and some ideating. So what if he doesn’t get involved in direct politics ? Is everyone required to ?

    Isn’t the philosophy of Freedom, to let everyone do what comes naturally to them, as long as no harm is done. NM did his business. As far as i know, he did it with lot of accountability. As far as i see, there is no harm commited in writing book with good ideas. Are you saying that anyone who writes a good book, is also *required* to act on it fully ? Why should anyone be *required* to do anything ? That’s a contradiction of the philosophy of Freedom you espouse.

    I don’t see how his inaction makes him a “stooge of congress”, just because you have too high an expectation from him, and he din’t live up to it.

    People do what they can do. You have your limitations. NM has his limitations.
    On the other hand, if NM did something that directly contradicted his words, that would ofcourse be hypocritical. I don’t see you present any evidence for that. (Lets see what MrA comes up with).
     

     
  16. chaitanya

    Hi Dr.Sabhlok,
    Every person has a set of natural talents that one employs. NM was initially a technical guy, then moved onto business, and now to book-writing, mentoring or whatever he does. So his natural skills are perhaps technical skills, business skills and some ideating. So what if he doesn’t get involved in direct politics ? Is everyone required to ?

    Isn’t the philosophy of Freedom, to let everyone do what comes naturally to them, as long as no harm is done. NM did his business. As far as i know, he did it with lot of accountability. As far as i see, there is no harm commited in writing book with good ideas. Are you saying that anyone who writes a good book, is also *required* to act on it fully ? Why should anyone be *required* to do anything ? That’s a contradiction of the philosophy of Freedom you espouse.

    I don’t see how his inaction makes him a “stooge of congress”, just because you have too high an expectation from him, and he din’t live up to it.

    People do what they can do. You have your limitations. NM has his limitations.
    On the other hand, if NM did something that directly contradicted his words, that would ofcourse be hypocritical. I don’t see you present any evidence for that. (Lets see what MrA comes up with).
     

     
  17. Sanjeev Sabhlok

    Dear Chaitanya

    I’ve written this blog post not for nothing. I hope to wake up Mr. NM. Let me repeat. This is NOT about his joining politics. JRD Tata did NOT join politics. But JRD was a citizen true to his character. He disagreed with Nehru and so he funded Swatantra.

    I’m saying that if socialism and corruption bothers NM so much that he keeps writing against it, AND if he keeps saying that Indians are strong on rhetoric and weak on action, then what has stopped him in the past many decades from at least FUNDING an opposition group that believes in freedom and good governance?

    His hypocrisy is what I’m pointing out. And that is a serious failure of character. My policy is – do what you say, else shut up. I say that to ANY Indian who criticises the system without offering an alternative in return.

    Regards
    Sanjeev

     
  18. Sanjeev Sabhlok

    Dear Chaitanya

    I’ve written this blog post not for nothing. I hope to wake up Mr. NM. Let me repeat. This is NOT about his joining politics. JRD Tata did NOT join politics. But JRD was a citizen true to his character. He disagreed with Nehru and so he funded Swatantra.

    I’m saying that if socialism and corruption bothers NM so much that he keeps writing against it, AND if he keeps saying that Indians are strong on rhetoric and weak on action, then what has stopped him in the past many decades from at least FUNDING an opposition group that believes in freedom and good governance?

    His hypocrisy is what I’m pointing out. And that is a serious failure of character. My policy is – do what you say, else shut up. I say that to ANY Indian who criticises the system without offering an alternative in return.

    Regards
    Sanjeev

     
  19. Anony-Mouse

    The hypocrisy element has been pointed out before.

    http://www.dancewithshadows.com/nr_narayana-murthy_infosys.asp

    And what about SKS Microfinance ? Was it a case of sleep walking ? If SKS shares plunge Murthy has much to lose, so naturally he puts his own interest first, ethics is second.

    Read carefully both articles within WSJ :
    http://blogs.wsj.com/indiarealtime/tag/nr-narayana-murthy/

    Murthy wanted IITs in Lahore and Karachi, probably because Indian IT salaries have gone up and margins are thinning. The whole business depends on labor arbitrage. And these IT companies will do everything possible to keep the Indian Rupee depressed, as they earn in US$. The lower the rupee, the costlier India’s oil bills, and everything. But who cares ?

    But, if, and only if, you redefine “a better India” = “a more profitable India” … everything would magically fall in place, now the title of the book makes sense.

     
  20. Anony-Mouse

    The hypocrisy element has been pointed out before.

    http://www.dancewithshadows.com/nr_narayana-murthy_infosys.asp

    And what about SKS Microfinance ? Was it a case of sleep walking ? If SKS shares plunge Murthy has much to lose, so naturally he puts his own interest first, ethics is second.

    Read carefully both articles within WSJ :
    http://blogs.wsj.com/indiarealtime/tag/nr-narayana-murthy/

    Murthy wanted IITs in Lahore and Karachi, probably because Indian IT salaries have gone up and margins are thinning. The whole business depends on labor arbitrage. And these IT companies will do everything possible to keep the Indian Rupee depressed, as they earn in US$. The lower the rupee, the costlier India’s oil bills, and everything. But who cares ?

    But, if, and only if, you redefine “a better India” = “a more profitable India” … everything would magically fall in place, now the title of the book makes sense.

     
  21. MrA

    Questions raised in this report at http://churumuri.wordpress.com/2010/01/05/of-all-the-gin-joints-in-all-the-towns-in-the-world/ were:

    # Should a major corporate be handing out huge cash prizes to the progeny of high political figures?

    # Should they be accepting it so eagerly and happily, howsoever valid their claims to it?

    # And because neither the media nor academia questions it, does it become all right in the eyes of the world?

    Yes, the above questions do expect a high standard of ethics, which in my view is essential if you want to have a “better India”.

     
  22. MrA

    Questions raised in this report at http://churumuri.wordpress.com/2010/01/05/of-all-the-gin-joints-in-all-the-towns-in-the-world/ were:

    # Should a major corporate be handing out huge cash prizes to the progeny of high political figures?

    # Should they be accepting it so eagerly and happily, howsoever valid their claims to it?

    # And because neither the media nor academia questions it, does it become all right in the eyes of the world?

    Yes, the above questions do expect a high standard of ethics, which in my view is essential if you want to have a “better India”.

     
  23. WBlo

    25 Feb News: Infosys stands accused of large scale visa fraud and tax fraud by own staff (whistleblower?) Principal Enterprise Solution consultant Jack Palmer in US Court. http://www.courthousenews.com/2011/02/25/34452.htm and http://www.techgoss.com/Story/463S12-Infosys-accused-of-Visa-fraud.aspx

    A previous case of Infosys involved Narayana Murthy’s nephew Phanish Murthy’s conduct which was settled out of court by Infosys paying out money (search on Google to find)

     
  24. WBlo

    25 Feb News: Infosys stands accused of large scale visa fraud and tax fraud by own staff (whistleblower?) Principal Enterprise Solution consultant Jack Palmer in US Court. http://www.courthousenews.com/2011/02/25/34452.htm and http://www.techgoss.com/Story/463S12-Infosys-accused-of-Visa-fraud.aspx

    A previous case of Infosys involved Narayana Murthy’s nephew Phanish Murthy’s conduct which was settled out of court by Infosys paying out money (search on Google to find)

     
  25. news & comment

    Right now a debate is raging here, as local Indian writers and artists in Bengaluru know that NRN has always been against the use of local language Kannada. These writers became angry when NRN was chosen to inaugurate the Vishwa Kannada Sammelana. That would be like asking Lord McCaulay to inaugurate a Sanskrit University. I don’t believe in language chauvinism but I think the writers have a right to express.

    http://www.bangaloremirror.com/article/10/201103032011030303075264735ef6ef9/Artistes-oppose-readers-support-Narayana-Murthy.html

    Bangalore Mirror (caution: a Times of India product!) claims that its readers are in support of NRN (even before the news is out? That is suspect). But most of the comments go like “he is a well known man” or “he is one of the richest man”. It appears that fame and money can substitute for all missing qualities in eminent persons.

    Ofcourse, nobody trusts the “paid news” media fully but I wish they would be less blatant in taking sides.

     
  26. news & comment

    Right now a debate is raging here, as local Indian writers and artists in Bengaluru know that NRN has always been against the use of local language Kannada. These writers became angry when NRN was chosen to inaugurate the Vishwa Kannada Sammelana. That would be like asking Lord McCaulay to inaugurate a Sanskrit University. I don’t believe in language chauvinism but I think the writers have a right to express.

    http://www.bangaloremirror.com/article/10/201103032011030303075264735ef6ef9/Artistes-oppose-readers-support-Narayana-Murthy.html

    Bangalore Mirror (caution: a Times of India product!) claims that its readers are in support of NRN (even before the news is out? That is suspect). But most of the comments go like “he is a well known man” or “he is one of the richest man”. It appears that fame and money can substitute for all missing qualities in eminent persons.

    Ofcourse, nobody trusts the “paid news” media fully but I wish they would be less blatant in taking sides.

     
  27. infosys visa case

    *Indian Company Under Scrutiny Over U.S. Visas*
    By JULIA PRESTON and VIKAS BAJAJ
    Published: June 21, 2011

    A giant Indian outsourcing company with thousands of employees in the United States is facing an expanding federal investigation prompted by claims from an American whistle-blower that it misused short-term visitors’ visas to bring in low-cost workers from India.

    The company’s visa practices are under scrutiny. N. R. Narayana Murthy, a founder and recently retired chairman of Infosys ……

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/22/us/22infosys.html?_r=1

     
  28. Harsh Vora

    Hi Sanjeev — Yesterday I was watching the show Citizen Journalist on CNN channel — featured in it was Narayan Murthy. When asked about whether he supports capitalist or socialist thought, he tersely replied that he was 'socialist' by thought and 'capitalist' by mind. Whatever that means! How can you be here and there at the same time? 

     
  29. chaitanya

    Iam guessing he might have actually said "socialist by *heart*, and capitalist by mind".

     
  30. peterparker

    It is not about parties, it us what people desire. Somehow, I have realized that Indians don’t want to get above the sane mediaval mindset and are happy as long as basic needs are met. And Indians get everything without doing anything and still cry foul.

    It has been 60 years and still there has been no industrialisation. How can we generate wealth without industries? Where are the products? Tools, technologies.

    Even Indian economy is all about how to give food to others,not how to create.

    Though I agree that congress also played a major role in keeping people poor and illiterates. But why is that that Indians just run away when the need of the hour is actual fight?

     

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