One-stop shop to make India 20 times richer

India the corruption gold medalist of the world

The facts do not lie. Despite slight improvements in perceptions about Indian corruption over the past 15 years, India is still ranked on par with China in terms of corruption by the extensive surveys conducted by Transparency International. These two SOCIALIST countries have thus managed to account for most of global poverty and corruption over the past 60 years. While poverty has slightly reduced now due to (relatively) more economic freedoms than these countries gave their citizens in the past, corruption has not budged. Both countries take the cake for misgovernance.

This is a shame, since examples of (relatively) good governance exist in Australia and New Zealand – particularly in the latter. Good governance is not rocket science. My writings about the reforms needed in public administration and political systems in India (see chapter 5 of BFN) are partly based on the experiences of Australia and New Zealand.

Table: India's Transparency International rankings 1995-2010

Year
India index
 India rank
China
index
Australia
index
New Zealand index
1995
2.16
8.8
9.55
1996
2.43
8.6
9.43
1997
2.88
8.86
9.23
1998
3.5
8.7
9.4
1999
3.4
8.7
9.4
2000
3.1
8.3
9.4
2001
3.5
8.5
9.4
2002
3.5
8.7
9.3
2003
3.6
8.7
9.4
2004
3.6
8.7
9.3
2005
3.5
8.6
9.4
2006
3.3
8.7
9.6
2007
3.2
8.8
9.6
2008
3.4
8.8
9.5
2009
3.4
8.6
9.5
2010
3.5
8.5
9.4

In BFN I wrote:  "No other well-established democracy generates super-corrupt, even criminal political leaders like ours does. While leaders in democratic free countries command respect, and sometimes even inspire the world, our political leaders inspire utter contempt. Prior to the inception of Transparency International (TI) in 1993, it was widely acknowledged that India was an extremely corrupt country, but there were few systematic comparisons. Since then, using international benchmarking, TI has consistently found India among the most corrupt countries in the world. Between 2001 and 2007 we occupied somewhere between the 70th and 90th position in the world in TI rankings. Even communist China, drug-infested Columbia and genocide-ridden Rwanda have at times been ranked less corrupt than us. Therefore, whatever else we may be today, we are definitely not the world’s role model on ethical behaviour. "

I also offered numerous ways in BFN to almost entirely eliminate corruption from India. One of these was:

"For every ten ranks that India rises on a sustained basis of two years in Transparency International rankings, there will be a 5 per cent one-off bonus (for politicians)." 

I guess I need to tighten up the performance indicator, but there surely must be a good way out there to link TI rankings to political remuneration.

NOTE THAT NONE OF THE REFORMS I HAVE SUGGESTED CAN POSSIBLY BE IMPLEMENTED BY CORRUPT CONGRESS AND BJP.

You will have to join and/or otherwise support FTI in order for these reforms to be implemented. 

Addendum: An excellent article in The Economist, 27 Nov. 2010.

View more posts from this author
5 thoughts on “India the corruption gold medalist of the world
  1. Ravi

    I think this whole ranking is on the "perception of corruption" rather than the actual corruption and only looks at the public sector.
    Few details regarding the NZ issue.  Am sure something similar can be found for Australia as well.
    http://www.voxy.co.nz/natio…orruption/5/69130
    The CPI measures perception of corruption and not hard data. We note that in April this year the Serious Fraud Office announced an investigation into serious allegations of corruption at a public entity"

    The CPI only measures the degree to which corruption is perceived to exist among public officials and politicians in New Zealand. It does not take into account the attitudes of the private sector when conducting business here and overseas.

    Transparency International NZ is very concerned about the apparent lack of awareness about issues of corruption amongst the private sector in New Zealand. In February 2010 we released a study into NZ private sector attitudes towards corruption. Key findings of the survey were:

    Only 44% of companies on the NZX50 have policies prohibiting bribery & corruption (this compares with 72% in the UK and 68% in the US) Only 14% of companies listed on the NZX 50 have sought to control the way in which facilitation payments are made by adding restrictions into their codes of conduct Only 10% prohibit facilitation payments altogether.

    Mr Tan says "When we look at the study results for the NZX50 and then factor in the 2010 CPI results of some of our major trading partners, for example China is 78th with a composite score of 3.5, we believe there is a real risk that New Zealand organisations do not take the risks of bribery and corruption seriously when operating offshore."

    We also call upon the government to do more to strengthen our regulatory and legislative environment in respect of combating bribery and corruption. Although NZ signed the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC) in 2003, we are one of only 18 countries not to have ratified it. 122 countries have both signed and ratified UNCAC.

    Not denying that there is no corruption in Indian Govt departments, but I dont think we could rely on these rankings really for the fact.

     

     
  2. Sanjeev Sabhlok

    Dear Ravi

    No study/survey, particularly of 180 countries, can possibly be perfect.

    But there is one rule in this world: what gets measured gets done. If you have a better way to assess the level of actual corruption please come out with it.

    In the absence of something better, TI’s work is best-practice today, and I’d like India to use it as ONE of the many indicators to remunerate its politicians.

    Regards
    Sanjeev

     
  3. Sanjeev Sabhlok

    Rakesh

    I’ve had a further think about this comment of yours. I’m removing it for now and will reconsider publishing it if you are able to provide me with at least some proofs (e.g. scanned copies of relevant documents) – if any. Pl. send them to me at sabhlok@gmail.com.

     

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.