India! I dare you to be rich

Category: Books

Republishing S.V. Raju’s review of ‘Breaking Free of Nehru’ (Freedom First, 1 October 2009)

I published this here (now, all these are digitised and available online on FF's website).

Republishing, to express my deep appreciation for SV Raju. He took the time necessary to provide carefully considered comments. 

===

BREAKING FREE OF NEHRU: LET’S UNLEASH INDIA! By Sanjeev Sabhlok.  Publisher: Anthem South Asian Studies, C-49, Kalkaji, New Delhi 110019. Pages: 290(including the preface)  Price: Rs. 495

Reviewed by S.V.Raju, formerly Executive Secretary Swatantra Party. Currently editor Freedom First.

The title is explicit, leaving little to the reader’s imagination. That’s typical of the author of this book. I have had the pleasure of knowing Sanjeev Sabhlok. Met him first at a conference he had convened at the Habitat House in New Delhi in January 2004 (to discuss the potential for the emergence of a liberal party) and to which he had invited me; subsequently through the occasional email; and since March 2008 as a regular contributor to Freedom First with his column “Come on Liberals: Let’s Change India”.

The book is well organised and the narrative style absorbing and quite passionate. You get the feeling that he is talking to the reader one to one. The preface explains who he is, why he resigned the IAS, how he got to write this book which in draft form had the benefit of critical comments from those who were broadly in agreement with the general tenor of his views.

The preface is also quite exhaustive, some 22 pages; so impatient is he to unburden himself, that the preface tells it all – almost! “The real choice before us today” he writes “is between two western models of governance – socialism and capitalism; between the life-denying concept of equality and the life-sustaining concept of freedom.” Freedom, to the author of this book is the flip side of capitalism and vice-versa. He does anticipate that this perspective might not be acceptable to everyone who upholds the sanctity of the liberty of the individual vis a vis the State and society.

There are six chapters in all, two appendices, a copious 5 pages of printed notes and a reasonably informative index.

Chapter 1 begins with what he describes as a “stylized overview of the history of our freedom and divided into three phases: First phase: pre-battle of Plassey 1757; second phase: 1757-1947; third phase: post independence.

Taking a critical look at India in Phase 1, Sanjeev Sabhlok concedes that India had “cultural unity based on Hinduism”. Citing from historian Vincent Smith’s Oxford History of India (1958) , ‘Indian unity rests upon the fact that…India primarily is a Hindu country’ the author accepts the fact that “Hinduism has therefore had a significant influence on the concepts associated with freedom, ” but the “individual still did not count for much being merged into collective identities such as caste.” For instance “very rarely do we find an individual artist’s name acknowledged in an Indian painting or sculpture…. even today beautiful paintings are sold without individual signature.” Or, unlike the Magna Carta, “no argument to advance justice or freedom was articulated in ancient India.” Yet another marker to indicate the absence of individuality was the “uniquely Indian trait of obsequiousness” particularly “towards ‘seniors’ in India.” Indians despite the foreign invasions by sea from the West were insular, perhaps because of difficulties of travel that prevented Indians from travel to the lands of the colonisers or perhaps it was due to the “great haughtiness among the Indian elites who believed they needed to learn nothing from others …” Frogs in the well – that is what our ancestors were for most of our history prior to 1757.”

Phase 2 the period between 1757-1947; Indians were quick to learn English as it helped Indians secure jobs as clerks which it did, but also opened the “Pandora’s Box of knowledge.” Indians were “quick to become aware of the enormous leaps made by Western political thought over the centuries with men like Raja Ram Mohan Roy Mahadeo Govind Ranade, Gopal Krishna Gokhale and Pherozeshah Mehta “catching up with the liberal ideas and start demanding self-governance.” Along with this also rose the “competing theory of socialism (or communism). Both rejected feudalism but, unlike the freedomwallahs, the socialists/ communists wanted to revert to the tribal state. The two distinct philosophers of these competing “Western ideologies” were Adam Smith and Karl Marx.

But only a few Indians like, Tagore and Gandhi raised the “broader issues in relation to freedom” even if these were “incidental to the focus on self-rule and opposing racism”. Sabhlok gives full marks to Gandhiji’s philosophy of non-violence: “the most awe inspiring independence movement the world has ever seen…far ahead of its time in its principle-based standards of political protest….His exposition of the equality among peoples and of non-violence protest were significant contributions to the freedom of mankind as a whole.”

In the 3rd phase: Independence and Freedom are not quite the same points out Sanjeev Sabhlok. “Independence is at best a minimum condition. It is very poorly related to the level of freedom prevailing in a society,” The author, clearly an incurable romantic, writes: “freedom needs constant attention, even fawning and at times ferocious battle to protect it against the enemies of freedom. Very reclusive, reluctant, but the most beautiful and graceful lady of all, is freedom.”! He cites with enthusiasm Rabindranath Tagore’s famous poem in Gitanjali “Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high…” pointing out that nowhere in this poem (written in 1912) does Tagore talk about independence. “Tagore’s poem is truly embarrassing to socialists. Each of Tagore’s lines resists socialism.” He interprets the poem as Tagore “asking …each individual to achieve this ‘heaven of freedom’. The Tagore poem points to an enabling role for government.” And has a dig at Nehru “Nehru never reminded us of this embarrassing poem.” Ah! But his daughter’s censors did! In 1976 when Minoo Masani then editor of Freedom First decided to reprint this poem to protest the infamous emergency and submitted the issue to the government’s censor under the censorship rule then in force, the poem was censored and its publication disallowed on the ground that it endangered national security and encouraged disaffection!

It is essential to understand the philosophical framework of what the author means by “freedom” to appreciate the rationale for his all out attack on Nehruvian socialism which did reach “dizzying heights of incompetence.” As someone who not only lived through those years of avoidable scarcity, misery and misgovernance but had the added opportunity, as the executive secretary of the Swatantra Party, to fight for “freedom” there is little that this reviewer finds wrong in his high voltage criticism of the Nehruvian era. This reviewer recalls an article by Rajaji in Swarajya (March 4, 1961): “The egalitarian socialism of the Congress is a fallacy and a fraud, a mere election-carrot for the donkey the Congress takes the electorate to be. We must kick the rider from our back, rider and carrot. The mechanism of wealth production is something quite different from the socialism of the Congress, which ignores the incentive, the capital, the frugal management and the output of work needed for increase of wealth.” This quote full justifies the grief expressed by the author for missing out on “the opportunities we have had in the past 60 years to bequeath to our children the greatest possible country on earth.”

In a passage headed “Rediscovering Rajaji” Sabhlok observes: “Rajaji, however, was no match for Nehru. Nehru was far more charismatic and popular. He also had populist policies.” True. Also true is his observation “Rajaji was als
o just too far ahead of his times.” But his next statement is only partially true: “People simply didn’t understand what he was saying, and he did not have sufficient time left to explain to them what he wanted to stay.” Oh they did. Rajaji’s big success was his denouement of socialism, even if he did not live long enough to strengthen the foundations of the party he started, and this, it must be underlined, he managed in Nehru’s lifetime; his daughter Indira Gandhi who ruled longer than her father ‘managed’ by corrupting and destroying the character of the people. After imprisoning a veritable phalanx of opposition leaders during the emergency she disfigured the preamble to the constitution by adding the words “socialist’ and “secular” to describe the Indian Republic.

The author is also an incurable optimist. Quoting with approval a statement by S.P.Aiyar, a political scientist that the challenge lay in finding “solutions appropriate to given situations but only those compatible with freedom” the author observes: “The
good thing is that while the Indian government is not the best protector of freedom in the world, it does not censor books of this sort. It does not prevent people from talking about their views. Its laws almost fully protect our freedoms. We are almost there! Just a nudge to our system of governance – including making our government get out of things where it has no business to be in, and rebuilding our political and bureaucratic institutions to make them compatible with transparency and accountability that are the hallmarks of freedom; and we could soon have the freest country in the world – and thus ultimately the greatest”.

So far this review has covered only the preface and the first chapter. There are five more chapters. Merely mentioning their titles gives an indication of the range of his endeavour – From the macro observations in Chapters 1; Overview of a Free Society Chapter 2 ;Problems with our Constitution (3) ; to micro diagnoses and offering cures in Chapters 4: Causes of Political Corruption in India; 5: Why is our Bureaucracy so Inept? 6: Unleashing India.

In the little space left for this review I shall refer, briefly, to just one of them: Chapter 3: “Problems with our Constitution”. This reviewer does not claim any special qualification to comment on the Constitution. Nevertheless he finds it difficult to understand the obvious ambivalence of the author on its merits. For instance even while agreeing that the Constitution has “served us reasonably well” and “has done us far more good than harm” he says elsewhere it is an “abstruse and distant document not easily understood, not of much interest to most of us….Evaluating its merits I find our Constitution a mediocre product.” compared for instance to its US counterpart. Describing the Constitution as a “social contract” and drawing attention to the fact that it has been amended 94 times, Sanjeev Sabhlok considers “the time has come to completely review and remake our social contract. A statement that he makes which this reviewer finds patently unfair: “The Constitution that we got was a hotchpotch compromise between the whims of the 299 people on our Constituent Assembly not the resonantly clear voice of freedom.” Maybe, but then should we make the best the enemy of the good? There are numerous troublesome matters that need attention, as the author himself details in his book. Surely the Constitution has not come in the way. Liberal critics of the numerous amendments to the Constitution have pointed out that every time the Indian Constitution was amended it resulted in the contraction of the freedom of citizens, whereas the few times the American constitution was amended it was to expand freedoms. In other words blame the carpenter not his tools.

As for the whims of the 299 people, let us be grateful that our leadership including Nehru had the wisdom to nominate men and women of calibre to add to the elected members of the Indian Legislative Assembly which included quite a number of liberals. It might also be recalled that the socialists boycotted the Constituent Assembly because it was not an elected one. Frankly your reviewer shudders to think of the kind of Constitution we would have had if its members had been elected on the basis of adult franchise. Not a liberal statement to make, but an honest one that many secretly felt but did not articulate! Remember Nehru’s Congress swept the polls in 1952 and 1957

Be that as it may, this book offers valuable inputs not only of problems arising from Nehruvian socialism but also point the way out even if some of them could be of the extreme kind that need further discussion – as for example the suggestion to dump the Constitution!

Regular readers of Freedom First have been reading issues raised in the various chapters from his book which are not referred to in this review but feature in his column “Come on Liberals, let’s Change India”.

The author deserves to be thanked for the massive effort he has put into presenting his case for what amounts to be nothing less than revolutionary changes( not “reforms” as he suggests in the Preface) to ‘unleash India’. Well worth the buy and acquire fresh insights.

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Mahadev Govind Ranade’s writings: full text/ PDF/ Word, and some writings about his work

This is a placeholder, with more info to be added as time permits.

BY RANADE

1) Essays on Indian Economics: A Collection of Essays and Speeches (by Ranade)

PDF | Word

My critique of his lecture on Indian Political Economy.

2) Rise of the Maratha Power

ABOUT HIM

Mahadev Govind Ranade: Patriot and Social Servant (PDF | Word)

M. G. Ranade and the Indian system of political economy (pdf)

The Institutional Economics of Mahadev Govind Ranade by John Adams, Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 5, No. 2 (Jun., 1971), pp. 80-92 [Word]

Remembering Mahadev Govind Ranade

Mahadev Govind Ranade: A Biography. by T. V. Parvate

Mahadev Govind Ranade (1842-1901) Life Sketch and Contribution to Indian Economy by  Debendra Kumar Das

Some "exam" notes.

RANADE GANDHI & JINNAH, ADDRESS DELIVERED ON THE 101ST BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION OF MAHADEV GOVIND RANADE  HELD ON THE 18TH JANUARY 1943 IN THE GOKHALE MEMORIAL HALL, POONA By The Hon'ble Dr. B. R. AMBEDKAR

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Gopal Krishna Gokhale – full text of his speeches and writings > PDF/ Word

This is a placeholder post. 

Here are a few sources I have found so far:

1) Speeches of the Honourable GK Gokhale  [1908]

Published in 1908 by G.A. Natesan. This document has over 300,000 words. I have converted into Word (I tried OCRing myself from the scanned PDF but that froze the computer). DOWNLOAD: SPEECHES OF THE HONOURABLE G. K. GOKHALE – in WordThis OCR version (in Word) is full of typos etc. But it is good enough to start some preliminary analysis.

2) Writings and speeches [1960s]

VOLUME 1Speeches and Writings of Gopal Krishna Gokhale Vol. 1 Economic (24 MB, PDF), Editors: R. P. Patwardhan and D. V. Ambekar. Asia Publishing House, Bombay, 1962. I've OCRd this into Word. DOWNLOAD WORD VERSION HERE.

VOLUME 2: A second volume was published in 1966 (focused on Political writings) [only the title]

VOLUME 3: A third volume was published in 1967 and focused on his Educational writings.

3) Gokhale and Economic Reforms

Gokhale and Economic Reforms

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Netaji wanted India to be a combination of Hitler’s Germany and Kim Jong’s North Korea

In chapter 18, entitled "A glimpse of the future", Netaji outlined the kind of party he wanted for India: No democracy, total socialist/fascist planning and comprehensive dictatorship.

"there will ultimately emerge a new full-fledged party with a clear ideology, programme and plan of action. It is not possible at this stage to visualise the details of this Party’s programme and plan of action — but one may attempt to give the bare outlines:

  1. The Party will stand for the interests of the masses, that is, of the peasants, workers, etc., and not for the vested interests, that is, the landlords, capitalists and money-lending classes.
  2. It will stand for the complete political and economic liberation of the Indian people.
  3. It will stand for a Federal Government for India as the ultimate goal, but will believe in a strong Central Government with dictatorial powers for some years to come, in order to put India on her feet.
  1. It will believe in a sound system of state-planning for the re­organisation of the agricultural and industrial life of the country.
  2. It will seek to build up a new social structure on the basis of the village communities of the past, that were ruled by the village ‘Panch’ and will strive to break down the existing social barriers like caste.
  3. It will seek to establish a new monetary and credit system in the light of the theories and the experiments that have been and are current in the modern world.
  4. It will seek to abolish landlordism and introduce a uniform land-tenure system for the whole of India.
  5. It will not stand for a democracy in the Mid-Victorian sense of the term, but will believe in government by a strong party bound together by military discipline, as the only means of holding India together and preventing a chaos, when Indians are free and are thrown entirely on their own resources.
  6. It will not restrict itself to a campaign inside India but will resort to international propaganda also, in order to strengthen India’s case for liberty, and will attempt to utilise the existing international organisations.
  7. It will endeavour to unite all the radical organisations under a national executive so that whenever any action is taken, there will be simultaneous activity on many fronts. [Source]
Here he is, in 1928, at a Congress session, wearing military regalia. Practicing to be Kim Jong xyz. [Source

SEE ALSO

Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose was an EXTREME fascist socialist/communist: no role model for modern India!

Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose’s book, The Indian Struggle #1

Nehru’s Fabian socialism destroyed India. Imagine what Netaji’s communism-fascism would have done.

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Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose’s book, The Indian Struggle #1

I've come across Bose's 1934 book, The Indian Struggle.

This post is to link the PDF copy which I found on the internet (I've placed a copy on my server, as a backup).

I've also made a Word version which I'm currently annotating/ commenting. Will publish more posts on this topic as I come across key findings.

Download the Word version.

ADDENDUM

Netaji went to Italy: "Netaji made a special trip to Rome in 1935 to present a copy of his book to Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, whom he greatly admired and whose ideals he would follow for the rest of his life."  [Source]

SEE ALSO

Netaji wanted India to be a combination of Hitler’s Germany and Kim Jong’s North Korea

Nehru’s Fabian socialism destroyed India. Imagine what Netaji’s communism-fascism would have done.

Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose was an EXTREME fascist socialist/communist: no role model for modern India!

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Ambedkar’s complete writings (full text PDF Word HTML – compilation/ collation)

This is placeholder post, for my convenience. Like I've done with Gandhi's complete writings I intend to combine these into a single PDF document (and single txt file) in due course. At the moment, I'm linking to the key sources of the documents.

[Do advanced google search within "http://www.ambedkar.org/ambcd/" to search for topics.]

Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Writings and Speeches all the Volumes – Creator : Hon'ble Dr. Anand Teltumbde and Compiler and progagator :Mr. Chakradhar Hadke. [List below]

=Columbia's major Ambedkar site (with annotated text of Annihilation of Caste, and much more: [site
=A timeline of Dr. Ambedkar's life and work: [on this site
=Some images of Dr. Ambedkar: [Indian Routes
="Castes in India: Their Mechanism, Genesis and Development" (1916): [on this site
="What Path to Salvation?" (speech, 1936): [on this site
="Waiting for a Visa" (fragment of autobiography, c.1935-6): [on this site
="Ranade, Gandhi, and Jinnah" (speech, 1943): [on this site
="Pakistan, or, the Partition of India" (Bombay: Thackers, 1945): [on this site
="Why Was Nagpur Chosen?" (speech, 1956): [on this site
="The Buddha and his Dhamma" (Bombay: Siddharth College Publications, 1957): [on this site
=The greatest cache of Ambedkariana, ambedkar.org: [site]

  1. Administration and Finance of the East India Company
  2. Ancient Indian Commerce
  3. Castes in India; Their Mechanism, Genesis and Development
  4. Small Holdings in India and their Remedies
  5. Mr. Russell and the reconstruction of Society
  6. The Present Problem in Indian Currency – I
  7. The Present Problem in Indian Currency – II
  8. Review: Currency and Exchange by H.L. Chablani
  9. The Evolution of Provincial Finance in British India: A study in the Provincial Decentralisation of Imperial Finance
  10. Statement of Evidence to the Royal Commission on Indian Currency
  11. Statement of Evidence to the Royal Commission on Indian Currency on 15th December 1925
  12. Review: Report of the Taxation Enquiry Committee, 1926
  13. Untouchables or the Children of India's Ghetto
  14. Essay on Untouchables and Untouchability: Social
  15. Essay on Untouchables and Untouchability: Political
  16. Essay on Untouchables and Untouchability: Religious
  17. Philosophy Of Hinduism
  18. India and Pre-requisite of Communism
  19. Revolution and Counter-Revolution
  20. Buddha or Karl Marx
  21. Riddles in Hinduism
  22. The Untouchables and the Pax Britannica
  23. Manu and the Shudras
  24. Lectures on English Constitution
  25. Paramountcy and the Claim of the Indian States to be Independent
  26. Notes on Acts and Laws
  27. Annihilation of Caste
  28. Federation versus Freedom
  29. Ranade, Gandhi and Jinnah
  30. Mr. Gandhi and the Emancipation of the Untouchables
  31. Communal Deadlock and a Way to Solve it
  32. What Congress and Gandhi have done to the Untouchables
  33. Who were the Shudras ?
  34. Foreword: Commodity Exchange by P.G. Salve
  35. The Problem of Rupee: Its Origin and its Solution
  36. History of Indian Currency and Banking
  37. States and Minorities: What are their Rights and How to secure them in the Constitution of Free India
  38. Foreword: Social Insurance and India by M.R. Idgunji
  39. The Untouchables: Who were they and why they became Untouchables?
  40. Maharashtra as a Linguistic Province (Statement submitted to the Linguistic Provinces Commission)
  41. Pakistan or the Partition of India
  42. Note on the Annexure (Chapter IX: A plea to the foreigner- Additional Chapter in Second Edition of what Congress and Gandhi….)
  43. Commercial Relations of India in the Middle Ages or the rise of Islam and the Expansion of Western Europe
  44. India on the Eve of the Crown Government
  45. Waiting for a Visa: Autobiographical notes
  46. The Constitution of British India
  47. Notes on Parliamentary Procedure
  48. Notes on History of India
  49. Preservation of Social Order
  50. With the Hindus
  51. Frustration
  52. The Problem of Political Suppression
  53. Which is worse? Slavery or Untouchability
  54. Need for Checks and Balances- Article on Linguistic State
  55. Thoughts on Linguistic States
  56. Buddha and his Dhamma

FOLLOWING BOOKS here.

Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Writing and Speeches Vol. 3

Ranade, Gandhi & Jinnah: Address delivered on the 101st birthday celebration of Mahadev Govind Ranade held on the 18th January 1943 in the Gokhale Memorial Hall, Poona – Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar

Castes in India: their mechanism, genesis and development – Dr. B. R. Ambedkar

Who were the Shudras? – Dr. B. R. Ambedkar

What Congress and Gandhi have done to the untouchables – Dr.Babasaheb Ambedkar

The Buddha and His Dhamma – Dr. B. R. Ambedkar

The Untouchables: Who were they and why they became untouchables? – Dr. B. R. Ambedkar

Pakistan or Partition of India – Dr. B. R. Ambedkar

==google drive list==

01.Caste in India.pdf

02.Annihilation of Caste.pdf

03. Maharashtra as a Linguistic Province.pdf

04. Need for Checks and Balances.pdf

05A. Thoughts on Linguistic States Part I.pdf

05B. Thoughts on Linguistic States PART II.pdf

05C. Thoughts on Linguistic States PART III.pdf

05D. Thoughts on Linguistic States PART IV.pdf

05E. Thoughts on Linguistic States PART V.pdf

05F. Thoughts on Linguistic States PART VI.pdf

05G1. Thoughts on Linguistic States Part VII.pdf

05G2. Thoughts on Linguistic States Part VII.pdf

06. Ranade, Gandhi and Jinnah.pdf

07. Evidence before the Southborough Committee.pdf

08. Federation vs Freedom.pdf

09. Communal Deadlock and a Way to Solve It.pdf

10A. Statesand Minorities Preface.pdf

10B1. Statesand Minorities Appendix.pdf

10B2. Statesand Minorities Appendix.pdf

11. Small Holdings in India and their Remedies.pdf

12. Mr Russel and the Reconstruction of Society.pdf

13A. Dr. Ambedkar in the Bombay Legislature PART I.pdf

13B. Dr. Ambedkar in the Bombay Legislature PART II.pdf

13C. Dr. Ambedkar in the Bombay Legislature PART III.pdf

13D. Dr. Ambedkar in the Bombay Legislature Appendix.pdf

14. Dr. Ambedkar with the Simon Commission Preface.pdf

14A. Dr. Ambedkar with the Simon Commission SecIV_V_VI.pdf

14C. Dr. Ambedkar with the Simon Commission C.pdf

14D. Dr. Ambedkar with the Simon Commission D.pdf

14E. Dr. Ambedkar with the Simon Commission E.pdf

15A. Dr. Ambedkar at the Round Table Conferences.pdf

15B. Dr. Ambedkar at the Round Table Conferences.pdf

16A. Evidence Taken Before The Joint Committee PART I.pdf

16B. Evidence Taken Before The Joint Committee PARTII.pdf

17.Philosophy of Hinduism.pdf

18.India and pre-requisite of communism.pdf

19A.Revolution and Counter Rev.in Ancient India PART I.pdf

19B.Revolution and Counter Rev.in Ancient India PART II.pdf

19C.Revolution and Counter Rev. in Ancient India PARTIII.pdf

20.Buddha or Karl Marx.pdf

21A1.Riddles in Hinduism PART I.pdf

21A2.Riddles in Hinduism PART I.pdf

21B.Riddles in Hinduism PART II.pdf

21C.Riddles in Hinduism PART III.pdf

22A.Untouchables or the children of India's Ghetto PART I.pdf

22C.Untouchables or the children of India's Ghetto PART III.pdf

22D.Untouchables or the children of India's Ghetto PART IV.pdf

23. Essay on Untouchables and Untouchability_Social.pdf

24. Essay on Untouchables and Untouchability_Political.pdf

25. Essay on Untouchables and Untouchability_Religious.pdf

26. Administration and Finance of East India Company.pdf

27A. Evolution of Provincial Finance in British India PARTI.pdf

27B2. Evolution of Provincial Finance in British India PARTII.pdf

27B4 Evolution of Provincial Finance in British India PARTII.pdf

27C. Evolution of Provincial Finance in British India PARTIII.pdf

27D1. Evolution of Provincial Finance in British India PARTIV.pdf

27D2. Evolution of Provincial Finance in British India PARTIV.pdf

27E.Bibliography.pdf

27P. Evolution of Provincial Finance in British India PREFACE.pdf

28A. Problem of Rupee_Preface.pdf

28B. Problem of Rupee CHAPTER I.pdf

28D1. Problem of Rupee CHAPTER III.pdf

28D2. Problem of Rupee CHAPTER III.pdf

28E. Problem of Rupee CHAPTER IV.pdf

28F. Problem of Rupee CHAPTER V.pdf

28G1. Problem of Rupee CHAPTER VI.pdf

28G2. Problem of Rupee CHAPTER VI.pdf

28H. Problem of Rupee CHAPTER VIl.pdf

28I. Problem of Rupee BIBLIOGRAPHY.pdf

30. Statement of Evidence to the Royal Commission.pdf

31. Evidence Before the Royal Commission on Indian15.12.25.pdf

32. The Present Problem in Indian Currency-I.pdf

33. The Present Problem in Indian Currency-II.pdf

34. Review Currency and Exchange by H.L.Chablani.pdf

35. Review Report of the taxation Committee, 1926.pdf

36. Foreword Commodity Exchange by by P.G.Salve.pdf

37. Foreword Social Insurance and India by M.R.Idgunji.pdf

38A. Who were the Shudras Preface.pdf

38B1. Who were the Shudras PART I.pdf

38B2. Who were the Shudras PART I.pdf

38C1. Who were the Shudras PART II.pdf

38C2. Who were the Shudras PART II.pdf

38D1. Who were the Shudras Appendix.pdf

38D2. Who were the Shudras Appendix.pdf

39A.Untouchables who were they_why they became PART I.pdf

39B.Untouchables who were they_why they became PART II.pdf

40B.Pakistan or the Partition of India PART I.pdf

40C.Pakistan or the Partition of India PART II.pdf

40D.Pakistan or the Partition of India PART III.pdf

40E1.Pakistan or the Partition of India PART IV.pdf

40E2.Pakistan or the Partition of India PART IV.pdf

40F.Pakistan or the Partition of India PART V.pdf

40G1.Pakistan or the Partition of India APPENDIX.pdf

40G2.Pakistan or the Partition of India APPENDIX.pdf

40G3.Pakistan or the Partition of India APPENDIX.pdf

40G4.Pakistan or the Partition of India APPENDIX.pdf

41A.What Congress and Gandhi Preface.pdf

41B.What Congress and Gandhi CHAPTER I.pdf

41C.What Congress and Gandhi CHAPTER II.pdf

41D.What Congress and Gandhi CHAPTER III.pdf

41E.What Congress and Gandhi CHAPTER IV.pdf

41F.What Congress and Gandhi CHAPTER V.pdf

41G.What Congress and Gandhi CHAPTER VI.pdf

41H.What Congress and Gandhi CHAPTER VII.pdf

41I.What Congress and Gandhi CHAPTER VIII.pdf

41J.What Congress and Gandhi CHAPTER IX.pdf

41K.What Congress and Gandhi CHAPTER X.pdf

41L.What Congress and Gandhi CHAPTER XI.pdf

41M01.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M02.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M03.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M04.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M05.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M06.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M07.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M08.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M09.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M10.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M11.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M12.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M13.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M14.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M16.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M17.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M18.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M19.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M20.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M21.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M22.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M23.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M24.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M25.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M26.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M27.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

41M28.Appendix_What Congress and Gandhi have done.pdf

42. Mr. Gandhi and The Emancipation of The Untouchables.pdf

43. A Plea to the Foreigner.pdf

44A1. Member of The Governor General PART I.pdf

44A2. Member of The Governor General PART II.pdf

44A3. Member of The Governor General PART III.pdf

44A4. Member of The Governor General PART IV.pdf

44B. Grievances of the Scheduled Castes.pdf

44C. Important Correspondence Relating To Transfer.pdf

44D. Statement.pdf

44E1. Dr. Ambedkar As The Member of Ex.Gov.Gen.Council QA.pdf

44E10. Dr. Ambedkar As The Member of Ex.Gov.Gen.Council QA.pdf

44E2. Dr. Ambedkar As The Member of Ex.Gov.Gen.Council QA.pdf

44E3. Dr. Ambedkar As The Member of Ex.Gov.Gen.Council QA.pdf

44E4. Dr. Ambedkar As The Member of Ex.Gov.Gen.Council QA.pdf

44E5. Dr. Ambedkar As The Member of Ex.Gov.Gen.Council QA.pdf

44E6. Dr. Ambedkar As The Member of Ex.Gov.Gen.Council QA.pdf

44E7. Dr. Ambedkar As The Member of Ex.Gov.Gen.Council QA.pdf

44E8. Dr. Ambedkar As The Member of Ex.Gov.Gen.Council QA.pdf

44E9. Dr. Ambedkar As The Member of Ex.Gov.Gen.Council QA.pdf

45A.Buddha and His Dhamma PART I.pdf

45B.Buddha and His Dhamma PART II.pdf

45C.Buddha and His Dhamma PART III.pdf

45D.Buddha and His Dhamma PART IV.pdf

45E.Buddha and His Dhamma PART V.pdf

45F.Buddha and His Dhamma PART VI.pdf

45G.Buddha and His Dhamma PART VII.pdf

45H.Buddha and His Dhamma PART VIII.pdf

46. Ancient Indian Commerce.pdf

47.Commercial Relations of India in the Middle Ages.pdf

48. India on the Eve of the Crown Government.pdf

49. The Untouchables and the Pax Britannica.pdf

50. Lectures on the English Constitution.pdf

51. Paramountry and the Claims of the Indian States.pdf

52A. Notes on Acts and Laws PART I.pdf

52C1. Notes on Acts and Laws PART III.pdf

52C2. Notes on Acts and Laws PART III.pdf

52D. Notes on Acts and Laws PART IV.pdf

52E. Notes on Acts and Laws Burden of Proof.pdf

52F. Notes on Acts and Laws Burden of Proof.pdf

53. Waiting For A Visa.pdf

54. The Constitution of British India.pdf

55. Notes on Parliamentary Procedure.pdf

56. Notes on History of India.pdf

57. Manu and the Shudras.pdf

58. Preservation of Social Order.pdf

59. With the Hindus.pdf

60. Frustration.pdf

61. The problem of Political Suppression.pdf

62.Which is Worse_Slavery or Untouchability.pdf

63A1.Dr. Ambedkar's Entry into the CA.pdf

63A2.Dr. Ambedkar's Entry into the CA.pdf

63A3.Dr. Ambedkar's Entry into the CA.pdf

63A4.Dr. Ambedkar's Entry into the CA.pdf

63A5.Dr. Ambedkar's Entry into the CA.pdf

63A6.Dr. Ambedkar's Entry into the CA.pdf

63A7.Dr. Ambedkar's Entry into the CA.pdf

63B1.CA Debates 15.11.1948 to 8.1.1949 Part I.pdf

63B2.CA Debates 15.11.1948 to 8.1.1949 Part II.pdf

63B3.CA Debates 15.11.1948 to 8.1.1949 Part III.pdf

63B4.CA Debates 15.11.1948 to 8.1.1949 Part IV.pdf

63B5.CA Debates 15.11.1948 to 8.1.1949 Part V.pdf

63B6.CA Debates 15.11.1948 to 8.1.1949 Part VI.pdf

63C1.Constituent Assembly Debates16.5.1949 to 16.6.1949.pdf

63C2.Constituent Assembly Debates16.5.1949 to 16.6.1949.pdf

63C3.Constituent Assembly Debates16.5.1949 to 16.6.1949.pdf

63D1.Constituent Assembly Debates30.7.1949 to 16.9.1949.pdf

63D2.Constituent Assembly Debates30.7.1949 to 16.9.pdf

63D3.Constituent Assembly Debates30.7.1949 to 16.9.1949.pdf

63D4.Constituent Assembly Debates30.7.1949 to 16.9.1949.pdf

63D5.Constituent Assembly Debates30.7.1949 to 16.9.1949.pdf

63D6.Constituent Assembly Debates30.7.1949 to 16.9.1949.pdf

63D7.Constituent Assembly Debates30.7.1949 to 16.9.1949.pdf

63D8.Constituent Assembly Debates30.7.1949 to 16.9.1949.pdf

63E1. Constituent AssemblyDebates17.9.1949 to 16.11.1949.pdf

63E2. Constituent Assembly Debates17.9.1949 to 16.11.1949.pdf

63F1.Third Reading of Draft Const17.11.1949 to 26.11.1949.pdf

63F2.Third Reading of Draft Const17.11.1949 to 26.11.1949.pdf

63F3.Third Reading of Draft Const17.11.1949 to 26.11.1949.pdf

64A1. On The Hindu Code Bill.pdf

64A2. On The Hindu Code Bill.pdf

64A3. On The Hindu Code Bill.pdf

64A4. On The Hindu Code Bill.pdf

64A5. On The Hindu Code Bill.pdf

64A6. On The Hindu Code Bill.pdf

64A7. On The Hindu Code Bill.pdf

64B1.On the Hindu Code Bill.pdf

64B2.On the Hindu Code Bill.pdf

64B3.On the Hindu Code Bill.pdf

64B4.On the Hindu Code Bill.pdf

65A.Dr. Ambedkar As The Law Minister 20.11.1947 to 31.3.1949.pdf

65B.Dr. Ambedkar As The Law Minister 3.2.1950 to 20.4.1950.pdf

65B.Dr. Ambedkar As The Law Minister 3.2.1950 to 20.4.1950.pdf

65B.Dr. Ambedkar As The Law Minister 3.2.1950 to 20.4.1950.pdf

65C.Dr.Ambedkar As The Law Minister 1.8.1950 to 22.12.1950.pdf

65D1.Dr. Ambedkar As The Law Minister 9.2.1951 to 21.4.1951.pdf

65D2.Dr. Ambedkar As The Law Minister 9.2.1951 to 21.4.1951.pdf

 

 

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