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Caste (Publication of jati and varna) Abolition Bill

Continuing on the issue of caste abolition, it is both hard and somewhat inappropriate for a government to get involved in a matter so intensely related with religion.

However, it surely violates the basic concept of equality enshrined in the Constitution if everytime some child reads a textbook reference to Nehru he is told that Nehru was a Kashmiri pandit (brahmin) or Ambedkar was an untouchable or Gandhi was a bania.

The qualification of the name of an individual with his caste is unconstitutional. It is like saying Ambedkar comes from a slave 'race', and Nehru comes from the 'rulers' 'race'.

While Hinduism sorts its evils out, it is NOT appropriate for the children of India to be taught this caste rubbish. 

Second, it is unconstitutional to advertise one's caste or otherwise publicise it – for it is intended to signal either an advantage or disadvantage over others on characteristics UNRELATED to actual merit/capability or even 'beauty'.

Therefore it is appropriate, in my current view (unless someone shows me that this line of thinking is untenable), for the parliament of India to enact a bill that forbids publication of jati and varna.

While abolition of caste will require significant and sustained effort from social reformers, the idea that people can ADVERTISE their caste, or that their caste is ADVERTISED in school textbooks is violative of any basic principle of equality.

Let's drive caste underground and make people doubt the validity of this idea That will help social reformers in their task of destroying and annihilating caste.

Sanjeev Sabhlok

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4 thoughts on “Caste (Publication of jati and varna) Abolition Bill
  1. Sandeep Datir

    Fully agree with cast abolition, caste has no place in society. However as our politicians see advantage in using caste card in electoral politics and to keep clinging on to power, they will never pass such bill and they keep inciting hatred/division of the society on caste basis. If it was not for politicians free market would have eliminated caste long time ago I think.caste based Reservation will never let anyone abolish caste system,hence caste /religion based reservation has to be sorted first I think

     
  2. Sunil

    Sanjeev, you are missing the point that caste in today’s India exists because of the incentives it offers in our command economy. I think the best way to remove caste from public fora is to restore the freedom to individuals from the state as you have been teaching us. If people want to discriminate others (in the name of caste or race or sex or anything else) the free market will impose sufficient costs on those. [trying to lighten the mood here] I guess we can call it law of Karma in free market.
    In true libertarian society, people will be free to buy any (text)books including those which advertise the caste. Let us fight to keep our state out of education.

     
  3. Sanjeev Sabhlok

    Sunil,

    I am afraid I strongly disagree that the market will resolve caste. Slavery was NOT resolved by the market. In fact, it was part of the market. I’m not libertarian since libertarians don’t understand the meaning of liberty. It comes with accountability. Caste is obnoxious from first principles. It must be actively fought against. Sometimes, a law is needed to assist social reform. Libertarians would have allowed sati and child marriage since that’s what the market wants. I think they are wrong in some basic ethical matters.

    s

     
  4. siva

    u r verrrery greate sunil,

    u talk about india,where is the dam india. the british united the country,they gave us administration,they leave india to indians.if caste was not exists in india,it never submits foreign rulers.
    kill the caste with crueal.this is the only way save india.

     

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